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That awkward moment when you tell all your workmates you’re a Christian.

Me & My Club ManagerLast night I was awarded the ‘Virgin Activist’ (previously named ‘Club Super Star’) for the first quarter at work. I think this is equivalent to the ‘Employee of the Month Award’ but it’s awarded every quarter at work. I love my job. And it’s been such a blessing after years of trying to find a workplace that will take me for who I am.

And I kinda knew I was in the running for the award when I’d received so much praise from the managers (we call them HODs = Head of Department). And I was convicted, since I’d been avoiding telling everyone what I actually do on a Sunday morning, that I should use that opportunity for the glory of Christ. In a way, it kinda felt like I was ‘coming out of the closet.’

So, I was finally called up there to receive the plaque. And with my eyes downcast for the entire time (Someone called out “speech!”), I spoke:

Thanks.

I am subject to your mercy when I screw up.

I guess I work hard because I follow Jesus, and because he’s my greater boss, I work even when no one’s looking.

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“Humbled.”

was the response I got after I asked a client at my gym how he felt about that exercise.

I find is so incredible that we can be so aware of the things that humble us and not so much so of the things that puff us up and make us behave as if we’re better than everyone else. But even more incredible is that it’s the things that humble us that can make us feel the most incredible.

Humility’s a subject that I seem to have made a hobby of studying over the past few years. I’ve enjoyed reading John Dickson’s ‘Humilitas: The Lost Key to Life, Love and Leadership and C. J. Mahaney’s ‘Humility: True Greatness’. But I think the most significant insights I’ve made on the subject have been through listening to Tim Keller’s sermons, particularly ‘The Sickness Unto Death’. In it Keller reveals how much we need God’s praise, and that all alternatives to God’s praise will ultimately fail. But more importantly, it is because in Jesus God brought his punishment so that we could get his praise that we truly humbled (and truly exalted at the same time).

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NTE 2010 Mission @ Glenquarie Anglican Church (Reflections)

“Don’t you have a saying, ‘It’s still four months until harvest’?
I tell you, open your eyes and look at the fields! They are ripe for harvest.”

John 4.35

I’ve had quite a few blogs lined up but hadn’t found the time nor the drive to blog them. But before I resume my regular blogging schedule, I would like to share some thoughts that I’ve had in light of the National Training Event (NTE) Mission I was partnered up with about a week back.

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Bible Bites (Job): If I was a rich man…

Previous Post: B’reshiyth בְּרֵאשִׁית

SIDE NOTE: I’ve been behind on my reading, which is to say, I haven’t done any reading that I had intended to. It’s not that I feel as if I’ve disappointed my rabid readers *cough*. But I feel like I’ve lost the flow I had intended for this blog and backtracking makes me feel cluttered (which is what I’ve tried to avoid by not having a lot of Widgets). It’s one of those things where I wish I could turn back time or slow down time enough so I could catch up. For, you see, before writing this post I had intended to have read

  1. God’s Undertaker (2007) by John Lennox – which I was foolish enough to procrastinate from buying at my church’s bookstall. Now only Koorong is selling it for under $10 and I haven’t been bothered to travel all the way up there myself. In fact, never have I ever been to Koorong (is usually my first response in that game).
  2. Paradise Lost (1647) by John Milton – which I could have found online but I had wanted to read God’s Undertaker before tackling this beast.

I guess I could set the Publish Date for the subsequent posts to days before this one but that would be cheating, not to mention confusing for you two readers. To fill in my own blank, I would say that if I was a rich man I would probably buy lots and lots of books (and DVDs) so that I would not have the problem of being behind.

Getting to the real blogging at hand, my last post left off with the people of the world scattered and no longer united by language as a result of God’s judgment on the people of Babel. Somewhere around this time, we find a rich man living in the land of Uz. I’m not entirely sure if this land was owned by the descendant of Noah through Shem (Gen 10.23), but it would add some cred to my Bible reading plan if it was 🙂

This man’s name was Job (Hebrew: אִיוֹב‎ ʾ iyov). It’s pronounced like joe-b, and NOT like the word for your occupation. And it seems like he wasn’t a descendant of Abram (I guess he could be considered a Gentile) yet he was faithful to God. He was just that good. And I know the Bible says that no one is good (Romans 3.12 and even Job 15.14) but Job comes very close, even to the extent that he would pre-emptively offer sacrifices as a precaution for the sins of his sons [1.5]. He was at least wise in his wealth.
He was both righteous AND rich.

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